The Closure of Glenn Home

In 1979, the number of residents at Glenn Home had dwindled and the operating costs remained very high. The boiler system in particular is said to cost over $100,000 a year.

February: Welfare director Glenn J. Cardwell went forward with a plan to shut down the orphanage, with the remaining children being sent to group homes.

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March: The Vigo County Welfare Board moved forward with Cardwell’s plans putting down payments on group homes, preparing for the sale of Glenn Home, and establishing personnel for the group homes.

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April: Plans for the group homes continue following council meetings and some opposition from residents who do not want the children to be relocated to a group home in their area.

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August: The July date proposed by Cardwell wasn’t met, but the plan was still progressing. The three buildings for the group homes were decided upon, and were being renovated to accommodate the children. New target date for moving children to group homes is set for October 1.

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November: The sale of Glenn Home is finally authorized. The girl’s group home is now in operation. The group home for boys and the receiving home are almost done with their renovations. Councilman Thomas Branam* opposes the sale. The home is to be turned over and all the children are to be in their new group homes before Christmas.

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*Thomas Branam seems to be related to Matt Branam, a former Rose-Hulman president who grew up in the Glenn Home. If anyone knows the exact relation, let us know.}